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Central Utah Water Conservancy District
Utah Valley Water Treatment Plant

2012 Annual Consumer Confidence Report on the Quality of Tap Water

Updated Source Water Protection Plan Available



Our goal is to provide you with high-quality, safe drinking water that exceeds every federal and state standard.  As mandated by the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), this "Consumer Confidence Report" details our water sources, the results of our water tests, and other information. You can count on us for Quality on Tap. Our results show it.

We are proud to report that the water provided by Central Utah Water Conservancy District - Utah Valley Water Treatment Plant meets or exceeds all established water-quality standards.

Call us for information about the next opportunity for public participation in decisions about our drinking water (801-226-7100). 

Overview

The Utah Valley Plant continues to participate in the Partnership for Safe Water Program, a new national initiative to help achieve operational excellence in water treatment.  The partnership is a voluntary program developed through cooperation among the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

Water Source

Central Utah Water Conservancy District-Utah Valley Water Treatment Plant is supplied by two surface water sources:  Deer Creek Reservoir and the Provo River. For information concerning the Central Utah Water Conservancy District-Utah Valley Water Treatment Plant Source-Water Assessment, request it from Gerard Yates, Water Quality/Treatment Department Manager at (801) 226-7100.

How to Read this Table

This report is based upon tests conducted in the year 2012 by Central Utah Water Conservancy District-Utah Valley Water Treatment Plant. Terms used in the Water-Quality Table and in other parts of this report are defined here.

Maximum Contaminant Level or MCL:  The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water.  MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal or MCLG:  The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health.  MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.


Key To Table

AL = Action Level pci/l = picocuries per liter (a measure of radioactivity)
MCL = Maximum Contaminant Level ppm = parts per million, or milligrams per liter (mg/l)
MCLG =  Maximum Contaminant Level Goal ppb = parts per billion, or micrograms per liter (g/l)
MFL = million fibers per liter ppt = parts per trillion, or nanograms per liter
mrem/year = millirems per year (a measure of radiation absorbed by the body) ppq = parts per quadrillion, or picograms per liter
NTU = Nephelometric Turbidity Units TT = Treatment Technique - AVWTP - 0.5 NTU
MNR = Monitoring not required, but recommended. ND = Non detect


Contaminant
Date Tested
Unit
MCL
MCLG
Detected Level*
Range**
Major Sources
Violation
Inorganic Contaminants
Fluoride
8/4/10
ppm
4
4
nd
nd-0.242
Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories
NO
Nitrate
11/16/2012
ppm
10
10
0.3
nd-0.33
Erosion of natural deposits; Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage
NO
Arsenic
8/4/10
ppb
10
10
2.3
nd-3.34
Erosion of natural deposits
NO
Barium
8/4/10
ppm
2
2
0.057
nd-0.07
Erosion of natural deposits
NO
Chromium
8/4/10
ppb
100
100
nd
nd-5.0
Erosion of natural deposits
NO
Copper
8/4/10
ppm
 
 
0.0025
nd-0.0025
Erosion of natural deposits
NO
Sodium
8/4/10
ppm
 
 
10.6
9-12.6
Erosion of natural deposits
NO
Sulfate
8/4/10
ppm
250
250
40
40-49.3
Erosion of natural deposits
NO
Microbiological Contaminants
Turbidity***
01/1/12-12/31/12
NTU
TT<=0.3
n/a
0.026
0.012-0.04
Soil runoff
NO
Volatile Organic Contaminants
TTHMs (Total Trihalomethanes)
1/12-12/12
ppb
80 ave.
0
40
21.2-70.4
By-product of drinking water chlorination
NO
Haloacetic Acids (HAA5)
1/12-12/12
ppb
60 ave.
MNR
30.8
16.3-47.8
By-product of drinking water chlorination
NO
Total Organic Carbon (TOC)
1/12-12/12
ppm
MNR
MNR
2.2
1.8-2.5
Naturally occuring plant material
NO
Bis (2-ethylhexyl) adipate
12/9/03
ppb
400
400
0.67
0-0.67
Discharge from chemical factories
NO
Radiation Contaminants
Radium 228
8/4/10
pCi/L
5
0
0.34
nd-2.79
Erosion of natural deposits
NO
Alpha, gross
8/4/10
pCi/L
15
0
3.8
nd-3.8
Erosion of natural deposits
NO



Water-Quality Table Footnotes

*Most recent test results.
**Range is lowest to the highest amounts detected.
*** Turbidity is a measure of the cloudiness of the water.   We monitor it because it is a good indicator of the effectiveness of our filtration system.  Although we ran many tests, only the listed substances were found, and all substances found are far below the MCL.


Explanation of Violations:  None



Unregulated Contaminants

During our testing, we found evidence that Cryptosporidium may be present in our source water, but has never been found in our finished water.  This parasite can cause outbreaks of intestinal disease, but scientists have not yet determined the best testing methods, or the levels at which a public health danger occurs.  Based on current knowledge, Cryptosporidium does not present a health risk for the general public.  See below for precautions special populations should take, and for a toll-free number for further information.

Central Utah Water Conservancy District-Utah Valley Water Treatment Plant did not test for Radon.

Required Additional Health Information

To ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes limits on the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water system.   FDA regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water.
Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants.  The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.  More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency's Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells.  As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.  Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

(A) Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.

(B) Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban storm runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.

(C) Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, stormwater runoff, and residential uses.

(D) Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic
and volatile organics, which are by-products or industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff and septic systems.

(E) Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities. In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems.  FDA regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health.

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than is the general population.  Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections.  These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.  EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).


National Primary Drinking Water Regulation Compliance

Variances and Exemptions

On April 19, 1995, our system was granted a reliability and consistency reduced monitoring waiver (once every 9 years) for inorganics and metals testing from the Utah Division of Drinking Water.  On June 18, 1996, our system was granted a reliability and consistency reduced monitoring waiver (once every 3 years) for volatile organic chemicals (VOCs), and a permanent use waiver for asbestos.

Other Monitoring

In addition to testing we are required to perform, our water system voluntarily tests for many additional substances and microscopic organisms to make certain our water is safe and of high quality.  If you are interested in a more detailed report, contact David Hardy, Treatment Plant Manager, at (801) 221-0192.




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